Healthy Relationships

Healthy relationships are a foundation for well-being. Increasing relationship skills and targeting risky behaviour with a harm reduction approach empowers adolescents to make healthier decisions about relationships, substance use and sexual behaviour.

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Local Champion: Claire Crooks, Ph.D

Over the last 15 years Claire Crooks has helped develop a program called The Fourth R which is taught in schools across the country and educates youth on the importance of healthy relationships. She also created a specific set of programs called Uniting Our Nations for First Nations, Metis and Inuit youth that are more culturally relevant and engaging.

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The Fourth R

Relationship knowledge and skills can and should be taught in the same way as reading, writing, and arithmetic, and therefore we refer to the classroom-based curriculum as the Fourth R (for Relationships) core program.

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WE SPEND AT LEAST 12 YEARS IN SCHOOL PREPARING FOR A CAREER.

HOW MUCH TIME DO WE SPEND PREPARING FOR A HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP?

ANY RELATIONSHIP?

Healthy Relationships, Safe Choices, Connected Youth

Promoting healthy youth relationships by building the capacity of schools and communities through innovative programming, research, education and consultation.

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What can parents do to help?

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Connect positively with your children at every opportunity

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Relate to your child or teen in an age-appropriate way

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Help your children develop empathy and respect.

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Help reduce the stress in their lives

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Be there: supervision matters

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Accept mistakes as learning opportunities

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Watch for signs of an unhealthy relationship.

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Remember positive parenting works.

Sexual Health

Sexual health is a big deal – as big as your overall physical health.

Being sexually healthy means that you are free from disease, violence, injury, fear and false beliefs. It also means that you are comfortable with your sexuality, and have the ability to control and positively experience your own sexuality and reproduction.

A healthy relationship makes you feel good about yourself and your partner. You have fun together and you and your partner can be yourselves. All relationships are different, but healthy relationships share at least five things in common – the S.H.A.R.E. qualities.

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Safety

In a healthy relationship, you feel safe. You don’t have to worry that your partner will harm you physically or emotionally, and you aren’t tempted to harm them. You can change your mind about something – like having sex – without being afraid of how your partner will respond.

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Honesty

You don’t hide anything important from your partner, and can say what you think without fear of being ridiculed. You can admit to being wrong, and you resolve disagreements by talking honestly.

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Acceptance

You accept each other as you are. You appreciate your partner’s unique qualities, such as shyness or spaceyness, and don’t try to “fix” them. If you don’t like your partner’s qualities, you shouldn’t be with that person.

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Respect

You think highly of each other. You do not feel superior or inferior to your partner in important ways. You respect each other’s right to have separate opinions and ideas.

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Enjoyment

A good relationship is not just about how two people treat each other – it also has to be enjoyable. (If it’s not enjoyable, why bother?) In a healthy relationship, you feel energized and alive in your partner’s presence. You can play and laugh together. You have fun.

Mandi Fields

Co-Chair

CTV London – Community Investments
Email: mandi.fields@bellmedia.ca
Phone: 519-691-2883 x 383

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